Revolution! (tossing out Tkinter)

QtDesigner

Wow, a real, live Python visual app designer!

In the last few weeks I realized I have a long way to go to figure out how the MultiListbox code works…it seems like even the simple function of selecting a line of data requires torturous hand-coding. Almost two months after setting out on my quest for a Python data management application, I am still tripping and stumbling over a single GUI element. And yet all it does is display columns of data, something Microsoft Access does in its sleep, and the MultiListbox isn’t even editable. I’ve become distracted and discouraged. There are functions in the MLB class that I’m not even close to understanding, and there is no detailed explanation of the code anywhere. Lately I’ve thinking, there’s got to be a better way. There’s got to be a way where I can focus my coding on what I want the GUI widgets to DO, instead of struggling just to bring them into functional existence.

So, this afternoon, I once again Googled “Python GUI builder” or something like this and found this series of videos on building Python GUI applications with the Qt framework. https://www.youtube.com/user/Deusdies2.

The first series of videos walk the user through how to download and install a Python interface to the Qt development framework, in this case PySide. The author of this video series uses PyCharm on Windows 7, so his desktop and mine are nearly identical, meaning it couldn’t be easier to follow along with him.  The first few videos walk through the creation of simple Qt-based GUI applications such as a calculator. Eventually it moves on to QtDesigner, which, wonder of wonders, is a “drag and drop” GUI designer very much like Microsoft Access and Visual Basic. Where Tkinter requires 100% hand-coding of just about every step of a widget’s function, even PySide coding by itself without the graphical Qt Designer seems much simpler and less labor intensive.

Yes, I have spent many months on Tkinter. Yes, it seemed like I was on the right track when I discovered the MultiListbox. I enjoyed, for a time, the challenge of trying to figure it out. But somewhere along the line, it wasn’t fun anymore. It was a chore. This made it all too easy to become distracted with other projects. That was the signal that something was wrong. I like a challenge and I have loved learning Python, but when it’s no longer enjoyable, it’s no longer worth doing.  It’s a little intimidating to think of learning a completely new GUI builder.  However once I saw that drag and drop designer, that shimmering promise of instantly knowing my app will look the way I want it to without all the trial and error, and each item I drop into my app already knowing how to do what it’s supposed to and all I have to to is give it parameters,  I thought, “This could make Python fun again.” So off I go on my next, unexpected Python path. I’m going spend the next phase of my Python adventure getting as much as I can out of Mr. Milanovic’s videos, and of course, sharing the results.