Unbounded by a binding

Once upon a time, fresh out of Code Academy, I Googled for a way to design a GUI in Python. I came across Qt Designer. Cool! It reminded me of Microsoft Access and Visual Basic. I could lay out windows, buttons, boxes and so on just the way I wanted, set their properties and add some code. I began learning about “slots” and “signals”, Qt’s system of connecting what a widget is supposed to do to what the user does to it. But before long, it hit me:

The code I was using to create this wonderful GUI was not Python; it was Qt.

Somewhere along the line I’d read that Qt could be used to make a GUI for use in Python, yet Qt and Python are completely separate languages, so how, I asked myself, could I possibly use a GUI created in Qt, in Python? It sounded about as likely as running a Mac OS application on my Android phone. For whatever reason at that time, I couldn’t find a clear answer to this, and other options such as wxPython and Tkinter drifted into my view, so Qt was quickly forgotten. wxPython looked cool but when I decided it would be best for me as a newbie to learn in Python 3, wxPython quickly dropped off my radar. I noted Tkinter is included with Python and has been around forever, so it seemed to be the best option of the three. Unfortunately, I found Tkinter’s documentation to be fragmented and in some cases, ancient. Trying to produce a simple table object gradually wore me down over a period of months, which taught me the hard way that Tkinter is apparently just fine for GUIs with simple buttons, text boxes and lists, but nearly useless for data objects any more complex than a listbox. The one or two times I’ve run across table-like objects for Tkinter, I found they were not compatible with Python 3.

Luckily, I was only one more frustrated Google search away from discovering an amazing concept that brings diverse languages together in harmony, letting them play ball joyously with one another and get along like BFFs:

Bindings.

I eventually discovered Pyside, which re-introduced me to its friend Qt, and now Qt and I are buddies again! The secret? Lay out, code and design the GUI of my dreams in Qt, and when done, it’s only one magical command-line incantation away form being transformed into a Python class object, ready to be called upon any time! Pyside changed the direction of my DataQ project and injected it, and my Python learning adventure, with new life. Before long I was able to finally create a real GUI widget for my app and even able to my data into it.

Next step: wrapping my brain around model-view programming.

TableForm

My original mockup idea..


Capture

So close!